Meanings of the Sakha Khomus

By Saydyy Fedorova South

Rediscovering the Musical Instrument 

Published date

13 June 2023

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I emerged into this vast world just like everyone else, with a canvas awaiting strokes of life’s colors. Yet, my journey took an intricate path, mirroring the complexities that unfolded around me.

It was in the midst of my darkest moments that the hauntingly enchanting melodies of the khomus beckoned me, igniting a flame within my soul and revealing a realm far more exquisite than the one into which I was born. From that moment on, I found solace in the embrace of my Sakha heritage, a realm where my roots run deep and my spirit finds eternal resonance.

The khomus, a mystical instrument of my people, became my sanctuary. Its delicate metallic whispers intertwined with the essence of my Sakha ancestry, connecting me to a rich tapestry of stories and experiences that transcend time. Through its melancholic tones and soaring harmonies, I discovered a language that spoke volumes, touching the hearts of those who listened.

The rhythms of my heart blended with the resonant vibrations of the khomus, weaving a symphony that echoed the triumphs and tribulations of my Sakha heritage.

There are many variations of the Khomus around the world, but very little is known about the version used amongst the Sakha people.  For the Centre Archive, I wanted to draw attention to the Sakha Khomus and the cultural significance behind it. As well as delivering a presentation on the instrument, I also performed live at the showcase for Migration Matters Festival. 

Archivist

Saydyy Fedorova South

Research

My research interest is drawn upon the emerging phenomenon of cultural significance that inspires all khomus players globally, as well as the folk culture and mythology of the Sakha people.

I welcome participants who would like to join the khomus music journey, specifically to take part in my study as an interviewee, discussing topics related to Sakha khomus and other jaw harps.

Contact
s.f.south@sheffield.ac.uk 

Photocredit KoZin Photography
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